Restoring and Reusing Degraded Landscapes

High Line Restoring and Reusing Degraded Landscapes

New York City’s High Line is an elevated greenbelt.

 Restoring and Reusing Degraded Landscapes

In 1992, Harvard biologist E.O. Wilson wrote: “Here is the means to end the great extinction spasm. The next century will, I believe, be the era of restoration in ecology.”

Check out this Sourceable article about restoring degraded landscapes with ecological restoration. New York City’s High Line park, China’s Loess Hills, and Minneapolis’ riverfront have all been reclaimed and are now useable and beautiful.

The Farmhouse Media is all about living sustainably through

  • green building

  • green cities

  • permaculture

What Are the Best Cities for Treehuggers?

What are the best cities for treehuggers?

American Forests’ 10 Best list is based on 6 main criteria.

Despite the emerald ash borer, some cities’ urban forests are healthy and well managed. What are the best cities for treehuggers?

According to American Forests, they are:

  • Seattle
  • Portland, Oregon
  • Sacramento
  • Denver
  • Austin, Texas
  • Minneapolis
  • Milwaukee
  • Charlotte, North Carolina
  • New York City
  • Washington, D.C.

And then there’s this nonsense. Those power lines should be buried, or at least relocated to the alleys.

What are the best cities for treehuggers?

Thanks, Xcel Energy!

The Farmhouse Media is all about living sustainably through

  • green building

  • green cities

  • permaculture

 

Learning From Strong Towns

The Strong Towns blog

The Strong Towns blog

The Strong Towns blog has been interesting reading today. It’s a great way to learn some things about highways, streets, stroads, urban and suburban development, community development, and more. There’s loads of info about why the infrastructure we have now is failing, crumbling, ugly, miserable, and so on.

The post above reminds me of Steward Brand’s book, “How Buildings Learn,” in which he talks about cheap, ugly, adaptable buildings. Brand calls these “low-road” spaces, and they’re great for business startups, musicians, artists, and anyone who wants to hack away at a building, improving its functionality, without worrying about how it looks. Oftentimes they end up looking sort of purposeful, if not graceful.

The Strong Towns blog

The Strong Towns blog

The strong Towns blog is where I first read about the Northeast Investment Cooperative in Minneapolis. An investment cooperative sounds like a strange animal, but what a great idea! A group of citizens pool their money and buy, rehab, and manage both residential and commercial property in their neighborhood. I’m curious about how they manage the group, how they work with the local government, and those sorts of logistical issues. I’ll have to check it out further.

From the NEIC web site.

From the NEIC web site.

The Farmhouse Media is all about living sustainably through

  • green building

  • green cities

  • permaculture