The Rogue Tiny House Emerges

The Rogue Tiny House, the project I’ve been building for about a year, is finally on its way to its new home outside Dolores, Colorado. Erica and I bought a 4.5-acre parcel near the confluence of the Dolores River and the West Fork of the Dolores River, with plenty of room for the Rogue and Atelier E, her tiny house. It’s a stunningly beautiful area with endless options for muckin’ around outside. Durango, Colorado, is about 70 minutes to the southeast, and Telluride, Colorado, is about 70 minutes to the northeast.

We need to finish the interiors of the two homes, as well as set up plumbing, electricity, and so on. When the building part is done, we will make one or both houses available on AirBnb. We’re looking forward to visitors!

image of the Rogue leaving the build site.

It’s a snug fit back at the build site in the Oregon forest, but that tiny house will emerge unscathed.

image Rogue Tiny House on the road.

The Rogue is finally on the way.

image of the Rogue Tiny House in Wells, Nevada.

The Rogue in Wells, Nevada, on the way to Colorado.

image of Atelier E, Erica's tiny house, leaving for the Colorado property.

Atelier E, Erica’s tiny house, leaving for the Colorado property.

image of the property in the Dolores River Valley.

Atelier E and the Rogue will settle down on this property in the Dolores River Valley.

Beautiful Architecture Positively Affects Human Health

According to researchers at Warwick Business School in Coventry, UK, beautiful architecture has a positive impact on human health. PhD student Chanuki Seresinhe, associate professor of Behavioural Science and Finance Tobias Preis, and associate professor of Behavioural Science Suzy Moat published their findings in a paper titled Quantifying the Impact of Scenic Environments on Health. Their methodology involved showing study subjects photos from the web site “Scenic or Not,” a crowdsourced resource of more than 217,000 geotagged photos from across Great Britain. Participants were asked to rate each photo on a scale from 1 to 10, with 10 indicating “very scenic,” and 1 indicating “not scenic.”

Beautiful buildings, such as St. Paul’s Cathedral, are good for human health.

According to researchers at Warwick Business School in Coventry, UK, beautiful architecture has a positive impact on human health.

PhD student Chanuki Seresinhe, associate professor of Behavioural Science and Finance Tobias Preis, and associate professor of Behavioural Science Suzy Moat published their findings in a paper titled Quantifying the Impact of Scenic Environments on Health.

Their methodology involved showing study subjects photos from the web site “Scenic or Not,” a crowdsourced resource of more than 217,000 geotagged photos from across Great Britain. Participants were asked to rate each photo on a scale from 1 to 10, with 10 indicating “very scenic,” and 1 indicating “not scenic.”

More info here.

Is Passive Solar Design Irrelevant?

Is Passive Solar Design Irrelevant?

Passive solar design principles have been recognized for decades and are on display in Frank Lloyd Wright’s Solar Hemicycle designs, to cite one high-profile example.

Once lauded for providing “free heat,” passive solar design principles are now recognized as being less effective at maintaining indoor comfort than superinsulated buildings.

As a new generation of do-it-yourself builders got busy experimenting in the 1970s, passive solar design ideas proliferated. Builders claimed that attached sunspaces, solar collectors, trombe walls, earth ships, and many more ideas could keep a house comfortable with minimal or zero use of fossil fuels.

Superinsulated designs, likewise, saw intense development in the 1970s, and have come to the forefront of green building thanks to the Passive House standard. This demanding approach focuses on improving air-tightness and insulation, decreasing thermal bridging, and setting rigorous levels for energy use.

Read more here.

Slender Skyscrapers Are Re-making Skylines

slender skyscraper

Slender skyscrapers are dramatic in form.

In Manhattan, Asia, and the Middle East, a new super-tall, super-skinny skyscraper form is gaining popularity. Though it’s unlikely they’ll ever be the dominant form, it seems that they fill a niche in crowded cities.

The structures’ smaller footprint enables them to squeeze on to smaller lots and make use of the vertical dimension. A project in Manhattan designed by Eran Chen of ODA New York – 303-305 44th Street – will contain 41 floors in its 600-foot height, though the building will be only 47 feet wide.

The design employs 16-foot gaps between floors to make room for gardens, enhance views, and reduce wind loads. The total gross floor area is 116,731 square feet, and floor plate area is 2,700 square feet.

This form of structure has its own appellation: the slender skyscraper.

Read more here.

Green Building Megatrends

10 Green Building Megatrends from the “Godfather of Green”

Jerry Yudelson, the “Godfather of Green”

 

Green building is facing a number of changes, according to “The Godfather of Green,” Jerry Yudelson. A LEED fellow and former president of the Green Globes rating system, Yudelson has recently written a book, Reinventing Green Building, in which he identifies 10 “megatrends” he believes will impact certification systems, markets, government rules, and green building technologies through 2020 and beyond.

Read more here.

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