Will Your Next House Be Printed?

Will Your Next House Be Printed?

3D printing is now a reality for small structures, and may soon be able to “print” larger buildings on site.

 Will Your Next House Be Printed?

Using recycled industrial waste, construction waste, and concrete, a Chinese company recently “printed” 10 small buildings at their factory near Shanghai. The process involves grinding the materials and creating a thick, quick-drying slurry that the machine lays down layer by layer. The company says the buildings cost just under $5000 USD each.

This process offers great potential for creating affordable housing and other buildings all over the world. Some people envision taking the printer to the job site and printing a structure all at once. Others think modular components could be printed at the factory and delivered to the job site ready to assemble.

The Farmhouse Media is all about living sustainably through

  • green building

  • green cities

  • permaculture

Looking to the Village for Tomorrow’s City Design

Looking to the Village for Tomorrow’s City Design; photo of dense urban city

Some dense urban cities grew from multiple villages, today’s neighborhoods.

 Looking to the Village for Tomorrow’s City Design

This article for Sourceable examines Kent Larson’s ideas about city design. He says, “Paris was a series of these little villages that came together, and you still see that structure today.” “The 20 arrondissements of Paris are these little neighborhoods. When you have that kind of structure, you get a very even distribution of shops, physicians, pharmacies, cafes, in Paris.”Larson, an architect and researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, advises a similar type of urban planning for today’s growing cities. He calls a neighborhood a “compact urban cell.” They’re about 1.5 kilometres across, and may house 20,000 to 50,000 residents, as well as most businesses and services the residents need on a daily basis.

“Most of what people need in life can be within a 5- or 10-minute walk,” Larson said in his TED Talk.

With 300–400 million Chinese moving to the cities in the next dozen years, accommodating more residents is crucial. His team at M.I.T. has been working on a city car and an “open loft chassis” that, he says, enable more people to live comfortably in a neighborhood.

The article continues here.

And here’s more interesting info about cities:

The Farmhouse Media is all about living sustainably through

  • green building

  • green cities

  • permaculture

 

Dee Williams Tiny House

Dee Williams tiny house photo

Dee Williams tiny house

Here’s a New York Times article about Dee Williams’ tiny house. With just 84 square feet, this one is really tiny. It’s well designed and beautifully crafted, and a couple photovoltaic panels provide her electricity. She has it parked on a friend’s lot, which seems to be the major issue with tiny houses—where do you put it?

More about tiny homes:

Tiny Homes Can Serve Diverse Housing Needs

Is This the Best Tiny House Design?

Tiny Homes with Great Design

A Tiny House in the Back Yard

A Tiny House Village

Tiny Homes and Green Neighborhoods

Does LEED-ND Work for Established Neighborhoods?

image of established neighborhood; Does LEED-ND Work for Established Neighborhoods?

LEED-ND was developed jointly by the Natural Resources Defense Council, Congress for The New Urbanism, and the United States Green Building Council.

Does LEED-ND Work for Established Neighborhoods?

Similar in ambition and execution to GBCA’s Green Star – Communities program, LEED-ND provides a framework for “greener” development on a neighbourhood scale. Thanks to the different missions of the principles involved in its genesis, LEED-ND combines elements of green building, New Urbanism, and smart growth.

More about LEED:

Ohio Senate Votes to Ban LEED

Do Green Ratings Impact Affordable Housing?

 

‘Sustainable’ Doesn’t Have to Cost More